About your Search

20110301
20110331
STATION
CSPAN 4
WHUT (Howard University Television) 4
KQED (PBS) 2
WETA 2
KPIX (CBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
MSNBC 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
WMAR (ABC) 1
WMPT (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 18
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. the united states will begin evacuating americans out of japan amid growing concern over the nuclear plant crisis. here's the latest. japanese military helicopters have begun dumping water on the crippled power plant to try to cool overheated nuclear fuel. engineers are trying to install a new power line so they can restore power to the plant's cooling system. a top u.s. nuclear official says he believes radiation levels at the plant are extremely high, and will soon be deadly. the obama administration has urged the evacuation of all americans from a 50-mile radius of the fukushima daiichi plant. now, charter planes will be brought in to help those wanting to leave the country. charlie d'agata is in yoshida, japan, with more on this. good morning, charlie. tell us the latest where you are. >> good morning to you, betty. well, you may be wondering where i am. we've been trying to make our way to the quake zone. the japanese military has taken over all the highways. obviously we're trying to steer clear of the nuclear power plant. we had to cut through the moun
questions about who is really responsible. i'm david wright in osaka, japan. >>> and now to an environmental scare closer to home. over the weekend a mile's long patch of sludge showed up in the gulf of mexico and washed up on the shores of louisiana's jefferson parish. the coast guard collected samples and officials say it does not appear to be from the bp oil spill. they say it is probably sediment washed into the gulf from the mississippi river. >>> the suspect in a grizzly murder at a yoga shop will be in court today. brittany norwood has been charged with first-degree murder. police say she killed her coworker and created an elaborate rouse to hide the crime. >> reporter: police say it was a fair of shoes that tipped them off. the crime scene had two sets of bloody footprints but one looked like it was faked. when police found norwood bound and gagged, they say the position she was tied up in was suspicious, with her hands tied above her head, she may have tied herself up. >> as we began analyzing the forensic evidence and looked at the medical reports, it was not supporting what the --
come back from a trip to japan. we're now here in washington talking as we tape this. you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas. what i am trying to understand is, why did you make that trip? if you answer me, because it was a great story, that is done enough. you have so many responsibilities that cut into a decision. why you do that? why did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say that it was a science and theory. a lot of it is, i feel compelled to go. it is not his that i covered the tsunami in indonesia or southeast asia, but i felt it was a story i had to experience tangibly. this incredible constellation of disasters -- at that moment, i felt there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there. part of being an anchor is a decision, where are your best their anchoring? the anchor of a really race. -- relay race. when is the best for you to take the whole broadcasting go overseas? it does change that balance. in the middle east, there were a host of correspondence to rivera and you were fantastic. " -- who were there and who worked fantast
informed. but there is just so much going on right now, what with japan and libya, the 2012 presidential race that half an hour just isn't enough. even if i leave out all the facts. so tonight, i'm going to cover it all at once. colonel gadhafi announced he's going to travel to iowa to dump sea water on the nuclear reactors which were attacked by france and england in retaliation for the earthquake, which polls show is the most qualified candidate. >> all right. welcome to "morning joe." it is 6:00 on the east coast. too bad we're not there. good morning. it's thursday, march 24th. joe and i are in los angeles again this morning. what time is it here? >> it's 1:15. here in los angeles, elizabeth taylor passed away. they are asking whether elizabeth taylor may have been the biggest movie star ever. of course, america will be remembering her over the next few days. >> she might have been. >> there is for so many reasons, through so many decades she was married to john warner, a senator. but he was number four or five. but also, of course, in the '60s and '70s. most really, most associated
point. you recently come back from a trip to japan. we're now here in washington talking as we tape this. you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas. what i am trying to understand is, why did you make that trip? if you answer me, because it was a great story, that is done enough. -- a that is not enough. you have so many responsibilities that cut into a decision. it costs a lot to send you and a group of people overseas. why you do that? why did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say that it was a science and theory. to go. it is not his that i covered the tsunami in indonesia or southeast asia, but i felt it was a story i had to experience tangibly. this incredible constellation of disasters -- at that moment, i felt there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there. part of being an anchor is a decision, where are your best their anchoring? the anchor of a relay race. when is the best for you to take the whole broadcasting go overseas? it does change that balance. in the middle east, there were a host of correspondence who were there and who were fan
an argument. >> that's a good point, that's a good point. you have recently come back from a trip to japan. we are now here in washington talking as we tape this. but you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas, and you have done a lot of that. what i am trying to understand is, in a way, why did you make that trip? if you answer "because it was a great story," is not enough. why did you make the trip? you have so many responsibilities that come into a decision. why, for example, did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say is a science and a theory. it is not. a lot of it is i feel impelled to go. it is not just that i cover that tsunami in indonesia and east asia, but i felt that that was the story that i had to experience tangibly, and to see. as we said, this incredible constellation of the disasters. i felt at the time, at that moment, too, that there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there, and part of being an anchor, as you know, is a decision about where are you best there anchoring. is and it -- isn't it don hewitt who coined this term, "anchor"? a
to make an argument. >> a good point. recently come back from a trip to japan. and we are now here in washington talking as we tape this, but you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas and you have done a lot of that. what i am trying to understand is, in a way, why did you make that trip? if you answer me, because it was a great story, it is not enough. why do you make the trip? you have seven responsibilities they cut into a decision, because it costs a lot to send you and a lot of people overseas. why did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say it was a science. it's not. a lot of this is i feel impelled to go. it is not just that i covered the tsunami in indonesia and southeast asia, but i felt that that was a story that i had to experience tangibly and to see. and as we said, this incredible constellation of disasters. and i felt at the time, at that moment, too, that there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there. part of being an anchor is a decision about where are you best there anchoring. isn't it don hewitt and coined the term anchor
russia, the eu, japan. maybe turkey, maybe saudi arabia. these all will be people who can hip the know sill -- facilitatr and bridge on it. you have to take a role among because you need them to take a position in an agreement perhaps that says we will respect what the afghans have agreed to. we will not intervene. we will treat afghanistan as it wishes to be treated, whether that's neutral or not aligned or some other basis. we will continue to provide them with economic assistance. if a new afghan government needs security help, we will do so. it says in effect that we need peacekeeping perhaps for verification and monitoring. a all though things are part of what we would call the second circle negotiation which fits in and around the first circle negotiation among afghans. >> i think what we saw is that in ten years on, this war, positions have changed and the parties have expressed these different opinions. this general attitude, i think, you know, led us to say, you can build a kind of construction around the word negotiation. >> charlie: here's my question. is this a role model
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)